Foster Agile: Not Gonna Happen, Pt. 2

Part of the Foster Agile series.

In the original Not Gonna Happen post, I wrote about how my step-father says “not gonna happen” when I set some unreasonable goal for our work renovating my house.  The post focused on how his statement of hard limitations forced us to adopt realistic goals and why having realistic goals is valuable.  I just had a conversation with some Scrum Masters, though, and I realize there is another value of “not gonna happen” that the original post skated right past.  Long before we get into the benefit of realistic and well-crafted goals, we get the benefit of facing the truth.

Many if not most folks have at least some interest in working with others collaboratively.  We want to find solutions that make us all happy.  We want to help each other out.  So when someone comes at us with an unrealistic request, it is very, very hard for us to bluntly say, “not gonna happen”.  Not only are we afraid of them killing the messenger, but being that blunt feels…uncollaborative.  In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if saying things that bluntly, even if dressed in slightly more corporate-friendly words, would result in the other person saying, “C’mon.  Why can you be reasonable?”

The truth is, steadfast adherence to one’s professional opinion of the impossibility of a given scope/time combination–i.e., sticking to “not gonna happen”–, is about as reasonable as you can be.  The trick is marrying that resolution to the truth with an attitude of cooperative invention, seeking and suggesting alternatives that could possibly work.  But that is one strange marriage: “not gonna happen” just doesn’t seem like it goes with the optimism of “here are a bunch of other options”.  If you let your desire to make things work out influence your sense of truth, “not gonna happen” turns into “won’t likely happen”, and then into “maybe it’s possible after all”.  Now the marriage is a mess, with neither partner true to itself: the truth of limitations is watered down, and the alternative plan probably hasn’t gone far enough to really address those limitations.

I now see the great challenge of keeping the marriage going in my head, between the hard “not gonna happen” and the soft “but, hey, partner, let’s work out some way that will happen”.  I recognize that I have often confused compromise with collaboration, trying in vain to compromise with the hard truth of limitations.  I’ll keep collaborating with others to find possible solutions.  However, going forward, when I really believe that something is simply impossible, regardless of the pressure put on me, I will try to say–and keep saying–, “Not gonna happen.”